Slice of History: Transition Pipe

By Julie Cooper

Each month in “Slice of History” we’ll be featuring a historical photo from the JPL Archives. See more historical photos and explore the JPL Archives at https://beacon.jpl.nasa.gov/.

Transition Pipe
Transition Pipe — Photograph Number 327-287A

This test setup was part of an investigation in 1954 of the stability of laminar pipe flow with respect to disturbances of different frequencies and amplitudes. A disturbance generator was developed using vibrating aluminum reeds and instruments measured how a small amplitude disturbance in the air flow changed as it propagated down the 115–foot length of a 2” aluminum pipe. It appears to be located in the concrete channel that was used in the 1940s as a hydrodynamic tank with a rocket-propelled towing car (the “Hydrobomb”). At the end of the room you can see metal rungs that were used to climb down into the channel when the water was drained.


This post was written for “Historical Photo of the Month,” a blog by Julie Cooper of JPL’s Library and Archives Group.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

    One Response to “Slice of History: Transition Pipe”

  1. Slice of History: Transition Pipe | JPL Blog | Hometown Pasadena | Says:
    March 4th, 2011 at 4:45 pm

    [...] the Full Story at JPL [...]

Leave a Reply

Please keep comments on the topic of the post, and avoid using links to external sites. Selected comments will be chosen for posting.